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Floridian's Can Do Their Own Solar: No Expertise Required Guide

Floridian’s can do their own solar: no expertise required guide is because any homeowner is allowed to do home improvements. Homeowners are only required to hire licensed installers and electricians when needed to meet the permitting & code requirements.

So lets say for arguments sake, you bought replacement parts for your car? You would seek out a qualified mechanic to do the work if you don’t have any expertise fixing your car. Wouldn’t you do the same thing if you bought solar panels?

Hire The Same People The Solar Company Does

The only difference between the two examples is most people know less about solar than they do about their car. It’s best to hire the expert installer/ electrician before you make any purchases of equipment. This is considered to be “doing it yourself” but what’s the difference if you hire the same people the solar company does, None!

The bottom line is the bottom line, you can save a small fortune and get the same equipment if not better. Companies add-on $10,000 to $15,000 over and above the cost of the solar equipment and installation.

The absolute bare minimum any solar company charges is $6000 over and above the cost of panels and installation. That’s just to get to breakeven and then they have to add-on $5000 profit based on a 7K solar system. $6000 is a low estimate because for many companies it can be as much as $10,000

Solar Company Proposal for a 7K System

Add-Ons To Every Solar ProposalCost of Add-Ons
The Cost of Salesperson$3000
Sales Manager$1500
Proposal Builders and Permitting Department$1000
Overhead: Rent, Auto Insurance, Vehicles, and Utilities$1000
Cost of Leads and Marketing$1000
Points for Low Interest 20 Year Loan Terms (Frequently Hidden Cost)$2500
Solar Panels, Inverter, Installation$17,000
Solar Company Profit$5000
Total$32,000

The solar company doesn’t pay any additional overhead costs, the buyer pays for them.

The solar company doesn’t pay out any of the costs until the finance company funds their account after financing is finalized.

Now you know” Why Is Home Solar So Expensive. Excess overhead costs is the driving force behind high home solar prices. Not only are the prices of home solar too high, but this business model is a hindrance to the growth of the home solar. But now there’s a better idea….

“Your Solar Advocate” Eliminates The Following Costs of Home Solar

Add-Ons To Every Solar ProposalCost of Add-Ons
The Cost of Salesperson$3000
Sales Manager$1500
Proposal Builders and Permitting Department$1000
Overhead: Rent, Auto Insurance, Vehicles, and Utilities$1000
Cost of Leads and Marketing$1000
Points for Low Interest 20 Year Loan Terms (Frequently Hidden Cost)$2500
Solar Panels, Inverter, Installation$17,000
Solar Company Profit$5000
Total Cost with “Your Solar Advocate” Free Service$19,250

Cut Out As Much Overhead Costs As Possible

The idea is to cut out as much overhead cost as possible because you want your home solar to be profitable. In 2020 and beyond home solar should be profitable because prices have gone down and consumer knowledge has increased.

There is no need to be paying ridiculous overhead costs the solar companies create. Homeowners deserve the profits from solar, not some random solar company. The only way you are going to get the best deal is to have an advocate who represents your interests only. Someone who knows the right contractors and wholesalers to guide you so you will get the best deal.

It does you no good to save money if the quality is not as good as a solar company. The beauty of working with “Your Solar Advocate” is you get to decide exactly the type of panels you want and what the various differences are? You get to decide how much you want to spend because you are dealing direct, cutting out the middleman?

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Floridian’s Can Do Their Own Solar: No Expertise Required Guide

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